THE COLLECTORS / VISITATION RITES II
Opening Reception: Saturday December 7, 6-10pm
From December 7 to December 28, 2013
 
The Collectors
Corinne Halbert      Chris Lin      Ryan Richey
“Art making in the 21st century is crowded with ghosts. Whether we acknowledge them or not, they are often not only present in our work, but are also the catalysts. Once it was a prerequisite to copy the old masters if you were to be an artist, now you usually just need a degree. Since we already have MFAs, we felt it was time to undergo that age-old tradition by attempting to make the works that deeply inspired us to make art in the first place.”


Visitation Rites II 
By Chris Smith & E. Aaron Ross
Visitation Rites is a venue (fire pit) for a sculpture exhibition and content generator for a documentary video of an art exhibition opening.  Using the concurrent exhibition The Collectors as the prompt and setting for the video, ghosts of art history will be burnt in effigy over the Franklin’s sacrificial altar.
Featuring work by:
Jessica Harvey / Ryan Richey / Chris Lin  / Corinee Halbert / Tim Pigott  /  Raphael  Barontini  /  Edra Soto /  Jeriah Hilwine  /  Stephanie Burke / Jim Papadopoulos / Anna Kunz /  Mara Baker /  Elijah James Valentin  /  Kelly Reaves /  Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford / Andrea Jablonski / Sarah Weber /  Karen Azarina  /  Catie Olsen  /  Kevin  Jennings





Corinne Halbert currently lives and works in Chicago IL. She was born in Anchorage Alaska and grew up in Suburbs of Massachusetts. She received her BFA in Film/Video at Massachusetts College of Art in 2003 and her MFA in Painting and Drawing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008. She spends much of her time working on her art work and underground comics.
Chris Lin is an interdisciplinary artist based in Chicago. Born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, He received his MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2008. Selected exhibitions includes Contemporary Art Workshop, Eel Space, and OP Shop in Chicago, Verge Art Fair, NY, Deluge Contemporary Art and Atlantic Centre for the Arts, FL. Publications includes Fiction At Work and Balliwik. Lin is the co-founder and collaborative director at Good Stuff House and the founding member and ukulele player of the folk-thrash-hop duo Hannis Pannis.
Ryan Richey was born in 1979 in Bloomington, Indiana. He attended The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he received a BFA and MFA. Richey has published much written work, especially in online literary journals such as independent presses Beard of Bees and Spork. Among others, selected solo exhibitions include My Whole Life, Spoke, Chicago and Gathering Smoke, Rowley Kennerk Gallery, Chicago. His work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions, including the recent Water-reading at ADDS DONNA 
Christopher Smith was born in Atlanta,GA from two orthotic and prosthetic professionals turned artificial flower salespersons. He now lives in Chicago, IL. Former and current projects include Second Bedroom, Medicine Cabinet, Terraformer, Downcast Eyes, Sofa King, Visitation Rites, and Tag Team. 
 E. Aaron Ross is a multi-disciplinary artist. A 2009 graduate from the University of Illinois at Chicago with one BFA in Graphic Design, and a second in Moving Image (video/film/studio art). He is currently living and working in the city of Chicago.

T H E   F R A N K L I N 
3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 

PH. (312) 823-3632 

HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT
http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/

THE COLLECTORS / VISITATION RITES II

Opening Reception: Saturday December 7, 6-10pm

From December 7 to December 28, 2013

 

The Collectors

Corinne Halbert      Chris Lin      Ryan Richey

“Art making in the 21st century is crowded with ghosts. Whether we acknowledge them or not, they are often not only present in our work, but are also the catalysts. Once it was a prerequisite to copy the old masters if you were to be an artist, now you usually just need a degree. Since we already have MFAs, we felt it was time to undergo that age-old tradition by attempting to make the works that deeply inspired us to make art in the first place.”


Visitation Rites II 

By Chris Smith & E. Aaron Ross

Visitation Rites is a venue (fire pit) for a sculpture exhibition and content generator for a documentary video of an art exhibition opening.  Using the concurrent exhibition The Collectors as the prompt and setting for the video, ghosts of art history will be burnt in effigy over the Franklin’s sacrificial altar.

Featuring work by:

Jessica Harvey / Ryan Richey / Chris Lin  Corinee Halbert / Tim Pigott  /  Raphael  Barontini  /  Edra Soto /  Jeriah Hilwine  /  Stephanie Burke / Jim Papadopoulos / Anna Kunz /  Mara Baker /  Elijah James Valentin  /  Kelly Reaves /  Jeremiah Hulsebos-Spofford / Andrea Jablonski / Sarah Weber /  Karen Azarina  /  Catie Olsen  /  Kevin  Jennings

Corinne Halbert currently lives and works in Chicago IL. She was born in Anchorage Alaska and grew up in Suburbs of Massachusetts. She received her BFA in Film/Video at Massachusetts College of Art in 2003 and her MFA in Painting and Drawing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2008. She spends much of her time working on her art work and underground comics.

Chris Lin is an interdisciplinary artist based in Chicago. Born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, He received his MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2008. Selected exhibitions includes Contemporary Art Workshop, Eel Space, and OP Shop in Chicago, Verge Art Fair, NY, Deluge Contemporary Art and Atlantic Centre for the Arts, FL. Publications includes Fiction At Work and Balliwik. Lin is the co-founder and collaborative director at Good Stuff House and the founding member and ukulele player of the folk-thrash-hop duo Hannis Pannis.

Ryan Richey was born in 1979 in Bloomington, Indiana. He attended The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he received a BFA and MFA. Richey has published much written work, especially in online literary journals such as independent presses Beard of Bees and Spork. Among others, selected solo exhibitions include My Whole Life, Spoke, Chicago and Gathering Smoke, Rowley Kennerk Gallery, Chicago. His work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions, including the recent Water-reading at ADDS DONNA 

Christopher Smith was born in Atlanta,GA from two orthotic and prosthetic professionals turned artificial flower salespersons. He now lives in Chicago, IL. Former and current projects include Second Bedroom, Medicine Cabinet, Terraformer, Downcast Eyes, Sofa King, Visitation Rites, and Tag Team. 

 E. Aaron Ross is a multi-disciplinary artist. A 2009 graduate from the University of Illinois at Chicago with one BFA in Graphic Design, and a second in Moving Image (video/film/studio art). He is currently living and working in the city of Chicago.


T H E   F R A N K L I N 

3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 


PH. (312) 823-3632 


HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT

http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/

November
curated by Jessica Cochran

Opening reception: November 2, 6-9pm
From November 2 to November 30, 2013 
November features new outdoor site-specific projects by Noelle Allen, Mara Baker and Deb Handler. Working dimensionally in mixed media, each artist is known for projects that try, test and push materials such as clay, paper, resin, metal and plaster to new ends using physical and chemical processes. On view for the entire month of November, the artwork’s surfaces and structures will be entirely exposed to (and activated by) wind, rain, snow and sun as Chicago transitions from fall into winter.
Noelle Allen lives and works in Chicago, where she is currently a Hatch Resident at the Chicago Artists’ Coalition. She teaches at at Dominican University. 
Mara Baker is a mixed media artist based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Trinity College, the Hyde Park Art Center and Cara and Cabezas Contemporary. 
Deborah Handler received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute in 2011. She works primarily in clay and drawing. 
Jessica Cochran is currently Curator of Exhibitions and Programs at the Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College Chicago and a curator in residence at the Chicago Artists Coalition. She has organized exhibitions for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Contemporary Arts Council, Poetry Foundation, Art Chicago and NEXT: The Invitational Exhibition of Emerging Art. She is the recent recipient of a Clinton Hill Curator’s Grant and a recent grant from the Craft Research Fund.
 
  
T H E   F R A N K L I N 
3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 

PH. (312) 823-3632 

HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT
http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/

November

curated by Jessica Cochran


Opening reception: November 2, 6-9pm

From November 2 to November 30, 2013 

November features new outdoor site-specific projects by Noelle Allen, Mara Baker and Deb Handler. Working dimensionally in mixed media, each artist is known for projects that try, test and push materials such as clay, paper, resin, metal and plaster to new ends using physical and chemical processes. On view for the entire month of November, the artwork’s surfaces and structures will be entirely exposed to (and activated by) wind, rain, snow and sun as Chicago transitions from fall into winter.

Noelle Allen lives and works in Chicago, where she is currently a Hatch Resident at the Chicago Artists’ Coalition. She teaches at at Dominican University. 

Mara Baker is a mixed media artist based in Chicago. Recent exhibitions include Trinity College, the Hyde Park Art Center and Cara and Cabezas Contemporary. 

Deborah Handler received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute in 2011. She works primarily in clay and drawing. 

Jessica Cochran is currently Curator of Exhibitions and Programs at the Center for Book and Paper Arts at Columbia College Chicago and a curator in residence at the Chicago Artists Coalition. She has organized exhibitions for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Contemporary Arts Council, Poetry Foundation, Art Chicago and NEXT: The Invitational Exhibition of Emerging Art. She is the recent recipient of a Clinton Hill Curator’s Grant and a recent grant from the Craft Research Fund.

 

  

T H E   F R A N K L I N 

3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 


PH. (312) 823-3632 


HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT

http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/

mAtT Nichols: Confident Anticipation +
Inaugural front yard project by Jaclyn Jacunski
Nichols-Confident Anticipation I’ve always had a strong interest in icons, symbols, and language, which frequently manifests itself in the creation of objects. However, over the past year I have been consumed by a direct interest in the power of images and narrative. Moreover, I have been extensively researching the work of three artists: Christopher Wool, John Baldessari, and Ed Ruscha. Interestingly enough, Wool has ties to Chicago, while Baldessari and Ruscha have California roots, which is especially meaningful to me because of my personal history and experience. Although their practices may seem very similar initially, I have very particular, varying, reasons for examining each individually. Specifically, I am intrigued by Wool’s early work for it’s ability to start a narrative in one place and end somewhere that is entirely unpredictable, all the while implementing very simple language. Conversely, Baldessari’s ability to juxtapose images and text in reduced compositions that seem to be infinitely full of potential and narrative grows more complex with time. Lastly, Ruscha displays yet a different approach all together in that his work relies on word play and linguistic ambiguity to create a psychological hook within the viewer. In the past I would have argued that the value in images lies within the artist’s ability to create original pictures and that the power in language is in its ability to create a definitive narrative. However, I think that this is an antiquated approach to making in general and that the contemporary values of aesthetic proclivity are changing to favor ubiquity in form and ambiguity in rhetoric. In support of this ideology, in the essay titled Structural Anthropology, Claude Levi- Strauss makes the argument that linguistically, “there are no necessary relationships at the vocabulary level”. Rather, the relationship of terms and their meanings are potentially and proverbially wide open. With this in mind I began reassessing my understanding of how the relationship between image and text effects narrative—considering the internet as the world’s largest resource for readily available, ubiquitous imagery. Subsequently, I sought to create a set of works in which image and text are inextricably linked, but add to one another’s significance. In this manner, to borrow from Levi-Strauss once again, the work is meant to “conceive of the relationship between myth and ritual as dialectical” with the image directly correlating to myth and the written word to ritual. The result is a set of pictures coupled with concise language— collaged digitally and showing a clear presence of the hand. Formally, I consider the language and it’s application to be of the utmost importance—alluding to classic mark making and composition. In this sense, the slightest change in typography or location of a single letter changes the pace, speed, and potential outcome of each juxtaposition. Therefore, the language not only creates a narrative, but dictates the method by which each picture is framed and must be considered. Additionally, my hope is that it is impossible to differentiate whether the language informs the image or vice versa, and further impossible for the viewer to stop trying. Moreover, of equal importance to the work’s content is the manner in which this body is produced. Thus, rather than having the work printed on paper, the images are fabricated as engineer grade freeway signs to OSHA specifications by a government contracted manufacturer. This process involves digitally printing the image, adhering it to a shaped piece of aluminum, and coating the image in high impact prismatic vinyl that emits a full color spectrum reflection when hit by light. My choice in selecting this mode of production is three fold, bridging the gap from digital input to analog output, implementing utilitarian materials that physically demand the attention of the viewer, and making the work a temporally sensitive experience that cannot be fully re-presented by way of technology.
mAtT Nichols holds a BA in art practice from U.C. Berkeley and was a merit scholar at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, receiving his MFA in 2010. He lives and works in Los Angeles.
Special thanks to CorbettVsDempsey, Dock 6, Chris Bradley, Christopher Furman, Bohdan Gorczynski, Joe Hardesty, Scott Hunter, and Dan Sullivan for making this project possible.

Inaugural front yard project by
Jaclyn Jacunski
At The Franklin’s front yard’s chain link fence, artist Jaclyn Jacunski will install cotton fabric naturally dyed with materials acquired from empty lots of East Garfield Park.
The urban landscape physically expresses and reflects the social, political, and financial networks that bind the community while also creating divides between us.
The work reflects on Lee Bogg’s theory of productive engagement on such spaces- to consider what is there, and what has been left behind in the community. The materials from the lot are used to create a new object that works to engage the public and is meant to be critical of the operations of power and property.
Jaclyn Jacunski lives and works in Chicago working in many formats with an emphasis in printmaking. She received her M.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and a B.F. A. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, trained at Tandem Press. She has taught at SAIC and Harrington College of Design. She has recently exhibited at the Center for Book and Paper Arts, Hyde Park Art Center and Spudnik Press Annex. Her artwork explores protests and acts of resistance in local communities, examining how these things manifest in signs, in the landscape, and media.

Opening: Saturday October 5from 6-9pm
From October 5 to October 27, 2013

T H E   F R A N K L I N 
3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 

PH. (312) 823-3632 

HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT
http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/

mAtT Nichols: Confident Anticipation +

Inaugural front yard project by Jaclyn Jacunski

Nichols-Confident Anticipation I’ve always had a strong interest in icons, symbols, and language, which frequently manifests itself in the creation of objects. However, over the past year I have been consumed by a direct interest in the power of images and narrative. Moreover, I have been extensively researching the work of three artists: Christopher Wool, John Baldessari, and Ed Ruscha. Interestingly enough, Wool has ties to Chicago, while Baldessari and Ruscha have California roots, which is especially meaningful to me because of my personal history and experience. Although their practices may seem very similar initially, I have very particular, varying, reasons for examining each individually. Specifically, I am intrigued by Wool’s early work for it’s ability to start a narrative in one place and end somewhere that is entirely unpredictable, all the while implementing very simple language. Conversely, Baldessari’s ability to juxtapose images and text in reduced compositions that seem to be infinitely full of potential and narrative grows more complex with time. Lastly, Ruscha displays yet a different approach all together in that his work relies on word play and linguistic ambiguity to create a psychological hook within the viewer. In the past I would have argued that the value in images lies within the artist’s ability to create original pictures and that the power in language is in its ability to create a definitive narrative. However, I think that this is an antiquated approach to making in general and that the contemporary values of aesthetic proclivity are changing to favor ubiquity in form and ambiguity in rhetoric. In support of this ideology, in the essay titled Structural Anthropology, Claude Levi- Strauss makes the argument that linguistically, “there are no necessary relationships at the vocabulary level”. Rather, the relationship of terms and their meanings are potentially and proverbially wide open. With this in mind I began reassessing my understanding of how the relationship between image and text effects narrative—considering the internet as the world’s largest resource for readily available, ubiquitous imagery. Subsequently, I sought to create a set of works in which image and text are inextricably linked, but add to one another’s significance. In this manner, to borrow from Levi-Strauss once again, the work is meant to “conceive of the relationship between myth and ritual as dialectical” with the image directly correlating to myth and the written word to ritual. The result is a set of pictures coupled with concise language— collaged digitally and showing a clear presence of the hand. Formally, I consider the language and it’s application to be of the utmost importance—alluding to classic mark making and composition. In this sense, the slightest change in typography or location of a single letter changes the pace, speed, and potential outcome of each juxtaposition. Therefore, the language not only creates a narrative, but dictates the method by which each picture is framed and must be considered. Additionally, my hope is that it is impossible to differentiate whether the language informs the image or vice versa, and further impossible for the viewer to stop trying. Moreover, of equal importance to the work’s content is the manner in which this body is produced. Thus, rather than having the work printed on paper, the images are fabricated as engineer grade freeway signs to OSHA specifications by a government contracted manufacturer. This process involves digitally printing the image, adhering it to a shaped piece of aluminum, and coating the image in high impact prismatic vinyl that emits a full color spectrum reflection when hit by light. My choice in selecting this mode of production is three fold, bridging the gap from digital input to analog output, implementing utilitarian materials that physically demand the attention of the viewer, and making the work a temporally sensitive experience that cannot be fully re-presented by way of technology.

mAtT Nichols holds a BA in art practice from U.C. Berkeley and was a merit scholar at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, receiving his MFA in 2010. He lives and works in Los Angeles.

Special thanks to CorbettVsDempsey, Dock 6, Chris Bradley, Christopher Furman, Bohdan Gorczynski, Joe Hardesty, Scott Hunter, and Dan Sullivan for making this project possible.


Inaugural front yard project by

Jaclyn Jacunski

At The Franklin’s front yard’s chain link fence, artist Jaclyn Jacunski will install cotton fabric naturally dyed with materials acquired from empty lots of East Garfield Park.

The urban landscape physically expresses and reflects the social, political, and financial networks that bind the community while also creating divides between us.

The work reflects on Lee Bogg’s theory of productive engagement on such spaces- to consider what is there, and what has been left behind in the community. The materials from the lot are used to create a new object that works to engage the public and is meant to be critical of the operations of power and property.

Jaclyn Jacunski lives and works in Chicago working in many formats with an emphasis in printmaking. She received her M.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) and a B.F. A. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, trained at Tandem Press. She has taught at SAIC and Harrington College of Design. She has recently exhibited at the Center for Book and Paper Arts, Hyde Park Art Center and Spudnik Press Annex. Her artwork explores protests and acts of resistance in local communities, examining how these things manifest in signs, in the landscape, and media.


Opening: Saturday October 5from 6-9pm

From October 5 to October 27, 2013


T H E   F R A N K L I N 

3522 W. FRANKLIN BLVD, CHICAGO (WEST SIDE / EAST GARFIELD PARK) 


PH. (312) 823-3632 


HOURS: F 4-6PM, SAT 12-4PM OR BY APPOINTMENT

http://thefranklinoutdoor.tumblr.com/